Judging

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ANOS ORCHID JUDGING

All ANOS judging activities are conducted as per the rules, guidelines and standards set out in the ANOS Judging Handbook. This may be downloaded here.

 The following is some general information about the ANOS judging system. More detail is available from the handbook.

The judging of Australasian native orchids is carried out by accredited ANOS judges who have undergone rigorous training and assessment. Judging operates through the various ANOS Regional Judging panels.  Full panels and training operate in New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria.

Each panel has an elected Registrar responsible for chairing meetings, rostering, coordinating panel activities at shows and award judgings, and maintaining the award register and image library.

A National Registrar is elected in order to coordinate the individual panel activities and is responsible for issuing award certificates, maintaining the master award database and master image library, and chairing meetings of the ANOS Judging Sub-Committee consisting of the National Registrar and the Regional Registrars.

The National Registrar conducts show and award judging at tri-annual ANOS Conferences.

There are three levels of accreditation for judges: Certificated Judge, Associate Judge and Judge.

All prospective judges must qualify by attending a training course usually conducted over a period of one to two years. The course covers all aspects of the many genera of native orchids occurring in the ANOS region, as well as the judging standards by which they are assessed. After passing both the theory and practical work  student will become a Certificated Judge and may then judge at monthly society meetings and join the panel as an observer in show bench judging and award judging.

After a satisfactory period of service (minimum of 12 months) a Certificated Judge may be elevated to Associate Judge. An Associate Judge has all the rights of a Certificated Judge and in addition may judge at shows, though not at championship level.

After another satisfactory period of service an Associate Judge may be elevated to Judge. This goal is normally reached in 4 to 5 years after commencing the judging course but may take longer.

SHOW JUDGING

Plants are judged in classes and the best species and hybrid are assessed by comparing plants and selecting those that are rated with the highest points.

 

THE ANOS AWARD SYSTEM

An owner of a plant considered worthy of judging for an award  should contact a judging panel member and an arrangement will be made for the plant to be previewed before a full panel is convened. Judges may also suggest award consideration for plants exhibited at shows and meetings.

If a plant is granted an award by the panel a fee of $25 is payable to cover costs of printing certificates etc.   The exhibitor is required to supply photographs of the plant, raceme and close up view of front, side and back  of a flower.

There are a number of possible ANOS Awards:

 

First Class Certificate (FCC)

To obtain an FCC a plant must score 85 points or more out of a possible 100, provided that the plant scores a minimum of 85% of the points available for Shape, 75% of the points available for Colour, and at least 60% of the points available in each of the other individual sections.

 

Award of Merit (AM)

To obtain an AM a plant must score at least 80 points out of a possible 100, provided that the plant scores a minimum of 80% of the points available for Shape, 75% of the points available for Colour and at least 60% of the points available in each of the other individual sections.

 

Highly Commended Certificate (HCC)

To obtain an HCC a plant must score at least 75 points out of a possible 100, provided that the plant scores a minimum of 75%of the points available for Shape, 75% of the points available for Colour and at least 60% of the points available in each of the other individual sections.

Note: if a plant falls below 60% of the available points in any section it cannot recieve any of the above awards.

 

Award of Botanical Excellence (ABE)

This award recognises quality in miniature or ‘botanical’ Australasian native orchid species. Due to their small size or the small size of their flowers, the full range of judging standards is difficult or impossible to apply to many species. Recognised awards of horticultural quality (FCC, AM, HCC) are inappropriate because of the difficulty of application of their standards. Nevertheless, recognition of quality in these species is essential.

For a plant to be granted an ABE it must be a recognised Australasian native orchid species.

It must be well established and in superior condition and have a good flower count commensurate with its species.

In judging a plant for an ABE, an overall evaluation out of 100 points is given. The plant should not be assessed only  in terms of shape, colour, size, texture, floriferousness and habit of inflorescence, but generally assessed within these criteria .

A plant must receive an averaged minimum of 75 points or more to be granted an ABE.

 

Award of Distinction (AD)

For a plant to receive an Award of Distinction it must have some feature outstandingly distinctive, should have a reasonable flower count commensurate with its genus or species or hybrid, must be a presentable plant and the flower(s) must be of at least reasonable quality. The award is granted on the majority vote of the Judges present.

 

Award of Cultural Commendation (ACC)

An ACC may be granted to the grower of a plant that exhibits excellence of culture such that it is superior in floriferousness, size, robustness and cleanliness of growth to that which could be reasonably expected from a mature plant of its type.

For the award to be granted, the plant must have been grown by the applicant(s) for a minimum period of two years immediately prior to the judging. Reasonable evidence of this time period may be requested by the Panel.

In the judging of a plant for an ACC, a points total from a maximum of 100 is allocated in respect of such attributes as floriferousness, overall plant size and vigour, presentation and perceived excellence of culture. A plant must receive an averaged minimum of 75 or more points for the award to be granted.

 

STANDARDS

A points system is used for Australian epiphytic species and hybrids. Appreciation Judging is used for all other “ANOS eligible” orchids.

 

Points Allocation

25 – Shape

20 – Colour

15 – Size

10 – Substance & Texture

15 – Floriferousness

15 – Habit of Inflorescence

100 – TOTAL

 

Shape (species) is defined as:

“To be of optimum shape within its own species and to be symmetrical about a vertical plane. However if it is the habit of the species to be asymmetrical then credit shall be given for plants that approach vertical symmetry.”

 

Shape (hybrid) is defined as:

“To be of optimum shape for the style of hybrid being judged and to be symmetrical about a vertical plane. However if it is the habit of the hybrid style to be asymmetrical (eg Dendrobium section Spatulata) then credit is given for plants or flowers that approach vertical symmetry.”

 

Colour is defined as:

“Includes white or any other colour or combination of colours. It should be clear, glistening and fresh, and all markings and shadings should be well defined. When assessing colour the qualities of beauty and appeal should be considered and credit given for colours that are unusual or have special beauty and appeal.”

 

Size (species) is defined as:

“Points to be allocated based on the optimum size for the species and the exhibit’s genetic background.”

 

Size (hybrids)defined as:

“Points to be allocated based on the optimum size for the style of hybrid and the exhibit’s genetic background.”

(and for both)

“Flowers should be consistent in size along the inflorescence.”

 

Substance & Texture is defined as:

“The flower or flowers should be of good substance and texture and should be firm, fresh, lustrous and without blemish.”

 

Floriferousness is defined as:

“The exhibit should carry a good floral display in proportion to its size. Credit should be given for plants that carry more flowers than is average for the (species or hybrid style) being judged. If it is the habit of the inflorescence to open progressively then only fresh and open flowers are to be judged.”

 

Habit of Inflorescence is defined as:

“The flowers should be displayed to best advantage and be fairly evenly distributed along the inflorescence which may be erect, arched or pendulous.”

 

Appreciation judging  takes into account the qualities defined in the previous definitions, without allocating points.

 

There are published guidelines in the handbook for terrestrial orchids and for judging of displays.


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